Author
Katharine Greenier and Rebecca Glenberg

Citation
71 Wash. & Lee L. Rev. 1233 (2014)

Published
September 30, 2014

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After forty years of providing safe, trusted reproductive health care, Hillcrest Clinic in Norfolk, Virginia, closed April 20, 2013. The clinic, which opened in October 1973, just nine months after the
Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade, was the first ever medical facility in South Hampton Roads to provide legal abortions. A bomber, an arsonist, and an antichoice extremist firing two dozen bullets into the clinic could not close Hillcrest’s doors. What did? Burdensome, discriminatory government regulations that imposed requirements unrelated to patient safety only on doctor’s offices and clinics providing first-trimester abortions. The clinic’s director, Suzette Caton, said that it would have cost the clinic $500,000 to install the new physical plant requirements, including new ventilation and temperature controls, required by the rules, none of which were required to provide good medical care. The onerous and unnecessary regulations Caton cited are called Targeted Regulations of Abortion Providers (TRAP).